Don’t Get Hissterical On Me! Part 2

Hi again guys! My last post was all about the most venomous snakes on Earth. Now, as promised I shall move on to the group of snakes known as “constrictors”.

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The constrictors are quite possibly even deadlier than their venomous cousins as these snakes are giants. At least if your bitten by a venomous serpent, there is a chance to escape and maybe get help. Unless you have superhuman strength, there is no escaping these powerhouses. These monsters, rather than inject venom into their prey, are ambush hunters and strike their unsuspecting prey and coils around them.

However, contrary to popular belief, constrictors don’t kill their prey by crushing them or suffocating them. Instead these beasts cut off blood flow to vital organs such as the brain and heart leading to unconsciousness and then cardiac arrest. These snakes, once they are sure their prey is dead, then go on to eat their food whole (even if that food is the size of a zebra or larger).

The four largest snakes on Earth are all constrictors and I will now discuss them and their ancient and even larger ancestor. They are the following.

The African rock python:

FB16F29B-89C9-43C9-BDF1-E3C475BA3E0DThis python is one of 11 living species in the python genus and is not only the largest in Africa, but one of the largest snakes on Earth. It has two subspecies, one found in Central and Western Africa and the other in Southern Africa.

Specimens of this snake may approach or even exceed a length of 20 ft and can eat prey the size of antelope, occasionally even crocodiles.

The snake reproduces like all other snakes; laying eggs, however, unlike other snakes, females of this species actually protect their eggs and even their hatchlings.

The Burmese python:

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The Burmese python, found in the tropical south and southeast of Asia, is one of the longest members of the snake family and easily one of heaviest, weighing about 182.8 kg on average. These snakes are often considered semi-aquatic and are mainly nocturnal.

The Burmese python, whilst heavier than the next snake to feature is not as long.

The reticulated python:

61B8B9AC-1C96-414B-BCF8-398D8EA00B28The reticulated python is the world’s longest snake and reptile! It can be found in South Asia and Southeast Asia. There have been people who have been killed and (in two reported cases) eaten by these goliaths.

These snakes are fantastic swimmers and have been reported far out at sea, having colonised many small islands within its range.

Fun fact: it is known as the reticulated python due to its pattern which is net-like or reticulated in design.

The green anaconda:

3DC5F917-FC36-479B-90C6-D20396B84E89The green anaconda is the heaviest snake on Earth and the second longest. It is found in north and central South America and, like the reticulated python, is a fantastic swimmer, spending the vast majority of its life in the Amazon River.

All of these snakes are giants and are extremely efficient and deadly hunters, but are nothing compared to their ancient ancestor…

The titanoboa:

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This creature was once found in what is now La Guajira, Colombia and could grow to be 42 ft long and weigh about 2,500 Ib.

I, however, know very little about this colossal monster and suggest you visit:

https://insider.si.edu/2012/03/largest-snake-the-world-has-ever-seen-is-being-brought-back-to-life-by-smithsonian-channel/

So there you have it everyone, two posts about snakes! I had a real blast making these and will be happy to take any further requests regarding any future posts I create!

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